Animation

Andy's picture

Flying boxes

flying boxes

In Web3D '17 Conference, James showed me how to do particle effect in Unity, which is very very cool. Then I thought that I may be able to create similar effect in my VRMath2 Editor. It turned out that it is quite easy to program in VRMath2, but of course the visual is not as good as in Unity. The simple codes, however, may be worth seeing, so here we go.

Andy's picture

Newton's cradle twist

Newton's Cradle

Recently, there is discussion about pendulum wave effect produced using the Newton's cradle. There are many YouTube videos about pendulum waves. Having seen some of these "amazing" wave effect, I thought that VRMath2 Editor should be able to produce a fake, but good enough to show the effect of pendulum wave simulation. And here you go, see the 3D simulation below.

Andy's picture

Sea simulation

sea simulation

In junior high school maths, there are usually questions about measuring the angle of depression and/or distance using trigonometry. Common examples could be like "Find the angle of depression from a lighthouse beacon 112 m above the sea level to a boat that is at a horizontal distance of 1.5 km from the lighthouse". A picture (not to scale) may be given as the one on the right. But then, what if the scenario is in 3D?

Andy's picture

A boat with a sail

Boat

A classic boat has a main body (hull) and a mast with a main sail. Using the build-in primative objects, there could be some possible boats contructed. In this blog, I used three objects: a SNOUT for the hull, a CYLINDER for the mast, and a 2D PIE for the sail. Of course these objects are scaled and textured with materials and images to be looking like (I hope blush) . 

ftang1's picture

Hydrochloric Acid (HCl)

Hydrochloric Acid

Hydrochloric Acid

by Felix Tang

Tli136's picture

Sodium Chloride Molecule

Introduction

Atoms are the basic building blocks of matter, fundamental and key to the formation of everything that exists around us. They make up the air, our bodies and even the very screen that you are staring at right now. Each atom has its own unique atomic structure along with its different characteristics.

These atoms join together into groups to form molecules of either elements or compounds. Elements can only consist of the same type of atoms that cannot be broken down into simpler substances, whereas compounds are made of two or more elements that are chemically bound together. An example of an important molecule in everyday life is Sodium Chloride or commonly known as salt.

AMART's picture

Fluorine Atom

Atom

Fluorine Blog

Utti's picture

Sulphuric Acid

 

 
Sulphuric acid is a pungent-ethereal, colourless to slightly yellow viscous liquid that is soluble in water at all concentrations. It is highly corrosive, dense and oily and one of the most important of all chemical, prepared industrially by the reaction of water (H2O) with sulphur trioxide (SO3). In different concentrations, the acid is used to manufacture fertilisers, pigments, dyes and detergents as well as in petroleum refining and metallurgical processes. Its most common use is in lead-acid storage batteries. In this blog, there will be a detailed analysis of the use of sulphuric acid, its bonds and characteristics. 
Utti's picture

Sulphuric Acid

This is a picture of sulphuric acid bonding

 

 
Sulphuric acid is a pungent-ethereal, colourless to slightly yellow viscous liquid that is soluble in water at all concentrations. It is highly corrosive, dense and oily and one of the most important of all chemical, prepared industrially by the reaction of water (H2O) with sulphur trioxide (SO3). In different concentrations, the acid is used to manufacture fertilisers, pigments, dyes and detergents as well as in petroleum refining and metallurgical processes. Its most common use is in lead-acid storage batteries. In this blog, there will be a detailed analysis of the use of sulphuric acid, its bonds and characteristics. 
tlsharlene's picture

Acetone

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Acetone

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