Andy's blog

Andy's picture

3D Graphing

3D Plot

There are many 3D visualisation software for mathematics. Most of them allow easy input of a function to create a 3D graph. VRMath2 also allows creation of 3D graphs. It may not be so easy if compared to other software. But I think that VRMath2 is better for learning because it provides more opportunities for construction throught programing. I call this the power of "Programming driven 3D modelling and visualisation".

Andy's picture

Ice Cream Cone

Ice Cream Cone

Hello, I have created an ice cream cone and I would like to show you how I did it. This simple ice cream cone has a cone and a sphere. The cone and sphere will overlap (intersect) a little bit. In this virtual ice cream cone, I have used both the graphic user interfaces (GUIs) and the Logo programming. When I completed it, I saved the Logo program (.logo file), the 3D world (.x3d file), and a screenshot (.png file) so I can show you in this blog.

Andy's picture

Truncated Icosahedron - Soccer Ball

Truncated Icosahedron

Quite a few geometry software can produce complicated geometrical objects. The Platonic solids and Archimedian solids for example, can be produced using dynamic geometry systems (DGS). If so, the process would be brilliant but complicated ways of formal Euclidean  reasoning. In VRMath2, similar reasoning may be used, but because it has a Logo programming or turtle geometry capability, most of these complicated geometrical solids can actually be constructed by moving locations and turning directions.

Andy's picture

Light with switch

Light with switch

After much thinking and planning, I have finally implemented an initial behaviour framework. Behaviour is different to animation. But it may also have effect of animation. In this blog, I have programmed a desk lamp -- a spotlight with a switch. You can click on the switch to switch on and off the light. When you do, you can also hear a switch sound, so have your speakers turned on to enjoy the virtual simulation of light, shadow and sound.

Andy's picture

VAM Temple project

VAM Temple

The VAM Temple project was completed by 3 primary school students (Year 5, aged 9) in 2003, using the archived VRMath 1.0 application. The Logo program they wrote at the time can still run in the new VRMath2 Editor with few modifications. You can try to recreate it in the VRMath2 Editor, by openning the  vam_temple.logo in the Logo Editor and executing the program.